September 29, 2013

CHRIST OR SCIENCE

    Chapter XIV of The Quimby Manuscripts by Horatio W. Dresser
[The articles published under this head constitute Vol. I of the Quimby writings. They are published here in the order in which they were copied from the originals, as written, save for a few changes made under Quimby’s super­vision, and slight condensations. They are printed in this order instead of being arranged in connection with other pieces on the same topics, because they were the first papers containing a statement of the general theory, and the copy­book containing them was sometimes loaned to patient—­students, including the one who made liberal use of their contents.
In these studies Quimby speaks of mind, in the ordinary sense of the term, as a “substance” which can be changed, in which thoughts are sown as seeds. Mind is put in contrast with intelligence or Wisdom. Thus intelligence is said to possess an “identity” or reality which mind does not have. The next step is to show that the human soul has clairvoyance or intuition, independent of the natural senses. This fact Quimby had proved by repeated experiments in diagnosing the sick.
The term “matter” is used in a peculiar sense throughout, to cover the processes of change attendant upon suggestion and taking place subconsciously. “Thoughts are things,” later writers have said.] (Horatio W. Dresser.)
[Continued from last week.—editor.]

HOW DR. QUIMBY CURES

Every phenomenon in the natural world has its birth in the spiritual world.1 The world gives credit where it is not due, mistaking noise for substance. No man should have any credit over his fellow men unless he shows some superiority over the errors of his age. To show that he is superior is to reduce to a science some phenomenon which has never been explained, music for an example. Before music was reduced to a science there was a phenomenon. People could whistle and sing, but no one supposed that the one who made the most noise was entitled to any credit above the rest. Credit was due to him who first reduced it to a science.
1 A cardinal proposition with Dr. Quimby.
Take diseases. The world is full of sickness, arising from various causes,—the phenomenon exists in the natural world, while the causes originate in an invisible world. Doctoring is confined to the natural world, and [it attributes] the causes of the disease to the natural world.
Dr. Quimby, with his clairvoyant faculty, gets knowledge in regard to the phenomena, which does not come through his natural senses, and by explaining it to the patient, gives [another] direction to the mind, and the explanation is the science or cure. To illustrate: suppose a patient calls on Dr. Q. for examination. No questions are asked on either side. They sit down together. He has no knowledge of the patient’s feelings through his natural senses, till after having placed his mind upon them. Then he becomes perfectly passive, and the patient’s mind being troubled [this] puts him into a clairvoyant state, together with his natural state, thus [he is in] two states at once; when he takes their feelings, accompanied by their state of mind and thoughts. A history of their trouble thus learned, together with the name of the disease, he relates [this] to the patient. This [state which he discerns] constitutes the disease and the evidences in the body are the effects of the belief. Not being afraid of the belief he is not afraid of the disease.
The doctors take the bodily evidence as disease. Disease with him does not come to the natural senses, therefore he cannot explain to the well his mode of treatment. The well take no interest, and his theory is of no use to them. Then what use is it to the world? To give the sick such confidence that they will not be frightened by the opinions of the world, for disease is an imprudent opinion. He throws the [patient’s] feelings off, and imparts his feelings1 which are perfect health, and his explanation destroys their feelings or disease. His theory in this respect differing from any other, is the result of the success of his practice. Therefore when he is with the sick, they feel safe. He is like a captain who knows his business, and feels confident in a storm, and his confidence sustains the crew and ship when both would be lost if the captain should give way to his fears. Dr. Q. comes to the sick as a pilot to the captain of a ship in a storm or fog, when dangers thicken and inevitable destruction threatens. He learns the trouble from the captain, and quieting the crew by his composure inspires them with confidence, gives other di­rections, and brings them into harbor.—Jan. 1860.
1 That is, the silent spiritual realization of the Divine ideal.

ANOTHER WORLD

What did Jesus mean to convey when He said all men had gone out of the way, that there was none doing good, no not one? It is generally understoood that man had wandered away from God, and had become so sinful that he was in danger of eternal banishment from the presence of God, and unless he repented and returned to God, he would be banished from His presence forever. This being the state of mankind, God, seeing no way whereby man could be saved, gave His only Son as a ransom for the redemption of the world; or, God made Himself manifest in the flesh, and came into the world, suffered, and died, and rose again, to show us that we should all rise from the dead.
This is the belief of most of the Christian world. Its opposers disbelieved all the above story but death. They can’t help believing that man dies, and they have a belief that there will be some sort of hocus—pocus or chemical change, that the soul or spirit will jump out at death, and still have an existence somewhere. After the soul is set at liberty, it can go and stay just where it pleases. Others believe it goes to God, there to be in the presence of God, and be a saint and sing hallileujah forever.
The above embraces all of mankind’s belief, and in this belief people feel as though Jesus Christ was the author and finisher of their faith. These beliefs embrace all the horrors of a separation from this world, and a doubt whether man will obtain that world beyond this life.
No person is in danger of this change but the sick, for if a person is well he can’t be dead, and if he does not die, he is in no danger of heaven or hell, therefore to keep well you keep clear of both. This was just about the same belief that the people had before Christ began His reform.
I will try to show that Jesus never taught one single idea of all the above, but condemned the whole as superstition and ignorance. He not only condemned the idea of a world independent of man, but proved that there was none by all His sayings and doings. He looks upon all the above theories or beliefs as false and tending to make men unhappy. These beliefs Jesus came to destroy, and established the Kingdom of God or Truth in this world. The two beliefs are in ourselves and we become the servant of the one we obey. The embracing of the true Christ is the resurrection from the dead. The dead know nothing. To be dead in sin or ignorance is [to be in a state of] separation from God or Truth. To know God is to know ourselves, and this knowl­edge is Christ or Truth. What is the difference between Christ’s belief, and the world’s belief? Christ had no belief. His Kingdom was an everlasting Kingdom, without beginning or end. It is a Science based on eternal truth. It does not contain an opinion or belief. It is all knowledge and power, and will reign till all beliefs and error shall be destroyed. The last error or belief is death or ignorance, the Truth and Science will reign till ignorance is destroyed. Then the son or law shall be subject to God.—Jan. 1860.
[This is the fifth installment of a fifteen—part series originally written and published as Chapter XIV. CHRIST OR SCIENCE, of The Quimby Manuscripts by Horatio W. Dresser. THOMAS Y. CROWELL COMPANY, 1921.—editor.]

Quotation by Phineas Parkhurst Quimby


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Editor’s Corner

Today we are continuing a fifteen—part serial review of Chapter 14, CHRIST OR SCIENCE, of the 1921 publication, of The Quimby Manuscripts by Horatio W. Dresser.
In Wisdom, Love and Light,
Ron Hughes
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